Archive for the ‘war’ Category

Marine uniforms not allowed at political events?

June 2, 2007

Marine Cpl. Adam Kokesh had already received an honorable discharge from active duty before he was photographed in April wearing fatigues – with military insignia removed – during a mock patrol with other veterans protesting the Iraq war.

Col. Dave Lapan, a Marine Corps spokesman, said Kokesh is under administrative review because he wore his uniform at a political event, which is prohibited. And, Lapan said, when a senior officer told Kokesh that he violated military regulations, Kokesh used an obscenity and indicated he would not comply with the rules.

“It’s the political activity that is prohibited, not the type of event that it was,” Lapan said. “If it had been a pro-war rally, it would still have been a violation.”

A second Marine who was at the same event was also called about the violation, but told the officer he was unaware he was breaking the rules and said he would not do it again, Lapan said. That Marine, who has not been identified, has not been called to an administrative hearing.

Army of God

June 2, 2007

Many Troops Return to War; Many Never Go
Jun 1, 9:29 PM (ET)
By PAULINE JELINEK

WASHINGTON (AP) – Even as troops in Iraq and Afghanistan are serving longer and more often – three, four, even five times – roughly half of Americans in uniform have not been sent at all.

Whatever the reason, it didn’t seem fair to Marine Sgt. Matthew Clark, who sits behind a desk in Illinois but has asked to “go to the fight” instead.

Clark is among some 1,000 reassigned for deployment since Marine Commandant Gen. James T. Conway issued a policy message early this year called “Every Marine into the Fight.”

“When they join our Corps, Marines expect to train, deploy and fight,” Conway said in the January message. “That’s who we are. That’s what we do.”

By this spring, roughly 150,000 active duty soldiers, 85,000 sailors, 90,000 airmen and 65,000 Marines had gone more than once to Iraq, Afghanistan or surrounding countries. About half the total force had not deployed to either conflict, Defense Department figures show.

Fifty-three percent of the active duty Air Force and 50 percent of the Navy had not been to the wars, not surprising since the fighting is overwhelmingly on the ground.

Still, 45 percent of the Marines and 37 percent of Army forces had never been deployed.

– The military is an ever-morphing body, with people coming in and going out constantly. The four branches recruited about 180,000 just last year – meaning there are always new people still in training.

– Though the two wars are the biggest Pentagon efforts, there are tens of thousands of forces in other parts of the world, from Korea to the Philippines to Africa

“There are a lot of folks doing God’s work right here stateside that are invaluable to the people overseas,” said Col. Daniel Baggio, an Army spokesman. “The spirit of the Army is really that folks want to do their part … in any way they can. … They go where they’re told to go.”

Anyone who stays in for more than one enlistment can pretty much count on going overseas.

“We like to say there are three kinds of soldiers: those that are deployed, those that have been deployed and those that are going to be deployed,” Baggio said.

Now, there are almost 220,000 troops, airmen and sailors serving in the Iraq and Afghan campaigns – 150,000 in Iraq, 28,000 in Afghanistan and 40,000 in neighboring countries and on ships offshore

Conway’s January order directed leaders to change policies “to ensure all Marines, first termers and career Marines alike, are provided the ability to deploy to a combat zone.”

Since then, officials have been identifying people who haven’t deployed, looking at assignment lengths and making needed changes, said Lt. Col. Kevin Schmiegel of the Marine assignments office.

Dakota Wood, a retired Marine and fellow at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, said it’s a good idea.

The Marine Corps is a “war-fighting-oriented organization,” Wood said. “People join the Marines to be operational. That’s the kind of person you’re drawing; they’re looking for excitement, engagement.”

You don’t get those things, Wood said in a football analogy, “if the same 11 guys take the field and you keep sitting on the bench.”

There are inevitably some people who don’t want to go, who are suspected of manufacturing a health problem or maneuvering into a job that will help them stay put, Pentagon officials say privately. In fact, there are those who like their location or work and don’t want any of the moves that can come with military life.

People in the military call them “homesteaders.” One is said to have worked in Washington his entire 17 years in the service and never been deployed anywhere.

Iran

April 10, 2007

I have lived through a revolution and a war in Iran. As a matter of fact and ironically, it was the Iraqis who were bombing our cities with American weapons and full support.

http://maryamie.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!9592F3DEF41537A3!3300.entry