Archive for the ‘food’ Category

Menu Foods / cuts and gravy / dog food / cat food

March 16, 2007

UPDATE: March 30, 2007
Here is some animal health information
http://www.avma.org/aa/menufoodsrecall/default.asp

[Friday, March 16, 2007: below is the text from the PDF file “Press_Recall_03162007.pdf” in case menufoods.com becomes slower than it is now or temporarily unavailable; also, some people do not have the ability to open PDF files easily or at all.]

UPDATE: Saturday, March 17: Their web site is working fast now:
http://www.menufoods.com/recall/index.html

Here are some more links I found:

http://www.fda.gov/opacom/7alerts.html

http://us.iams.com/iams/en_US/jsp/IAMS_Page.jsp?pageID=PCA&articleID=300003

http://us.eukanuba.com/eukanuba/en_US/jsp/Euk_Page.jsp?pageID=MC&newsArticleID=22&intcmp=HM_PRR

http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/stories.pl?ACCT=109&STORY=/www/story/03-17-2007/0004548036&EDATE=

http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/070316/20070316005830.html

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PRESS RELEASE

Menu Foods Income Fund
TSX: MEW.UN

March 16, 2007
Menu Foods Income Fund Announces Precautionary Dog and Cat Food Recall
TORONTO, ONTARIO–(CCNMatthews – March 16, 2007) –

NOT FOR RELEASE OVER US NEWSWIRE SERVICES

Attention Business/Financial Editors

Menu Foods Income Fund (the “Fund”) (TSX:MEW.UN) today announced the precautionary recall of a portion of the dog and cat food it
manufactured between December 3, 2006 and March 6, 2007. The recall is limited to “cuts and gravy” style pet food in cans and pouches
manufactured at two of the Fund’s United States facilities. These products are both manufactured and sold under private-label and are
contract-manufactured for some national brands.

Over the past several days, the Fund has received feedback in the United States (none in Canada) raising concerns about pet food
manufactured since early December, and its impact on the renal health of the pets consuming the products. Shortly after receipt of the first
complaint, the Fund initiated a substantial battery of technical tests, conducted by both internal and external specialists, but has failed to
identify any issues with the products in question. The Fund has, however, discovered that timing of the production associated with these
complaints, coincides with the introduction of an ingredient from a new supplier. The Fund stopped using this ingredient shortly after this
discovery and production since then has been undertaken using ingredients from another source.

At the same time, the Fund’s largest customer, for which it manufactures on a contract basis, received a small number of consumer
complaints and has initiated its own recall. Furthermore, for the time being, the customer has put future orders for cuts and gravy products on
hold. This customer’s cuts and gravy purchases in 2006 represented approximately 11% of the Fund’s annual revenue.

“We take these complaints very seriously and, while we are still looking for a specific cause, we are acting to err on the side of caution” said
Paul K. Henderson, President and CEO, Menu Foods. “We will do whatever is necessary to ensure that our products maintain the very
highest quality standards.”

While the number of complaints has been relatively small, Menu is taking this proactive step out of an abundance of caution, because the
health and well-being of pets is paramount to the Fund.

In addition to changing suppliers, for production after March 6, the Fund has increased testing of all raw materials and finished goods. It is
also working closely with regulatory authorities and its customers to learn more and will take whatever additional actions are appropriate. The
Fund estimates that based on currently available information, this recall could cost between $30 million and $40 million, which will be
financed from a combination of internally generated cash flow and bank credit facilities. Furthermore, the Fund is aggressively producing
product, utilizing a different supplier for the ingredient in question, to replenish customers as quickly as possible.

In order to determine whether cat and dog food in their possession is subject to recall, consumers should refer to the list of brand names
(“listed products”) at http://www.menufoods.com/recall. This will be available by 6 a.m. Saturday March 17, 2007. Products not identified on the
website can continue to be used.

Menu is the leading North American private-label/contract manufacturer of wet pet food products sold by supermarket retailers, mass
merchandisers, pet specialty retailers and other retail and wholesale outlets. In 2006, the Fund produced more than one billion containers.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Menu Foods Income Fund
Media and Investor Relations
Sarah Tuite
(416) 848-1703

or

Menu Foods Income Fund
Consumers
1-866-463-6738
Website: http://www.menufoods.com

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California prisons

December 23, 2006

(I will edit this post and add comments later.)

With males vastly outnumbering females behind bars, prisons are typically designed and managed for violent men.

At a minimum, advocates want more female guards, to protect women’s privacy and dignity; more food for pregnant inmates; easier access to sanitary products; and regulations for visits that enhance, rather than discourage, the preservation of close family ties.

The California Legislative Women’s Caucus has made incarcerated women its top priority this year. In an unusual April fact-finding mission, four lawmakers visited Valley State, and two of them spent the night.

They went through processing as inmates do, minus the strip search, receiving bedrolls and cell assignments. They ate in the dining hall, slept on the thin mattresses and asked women about their problems and personal stories.

Some complaints mirrored those in men’s prison: Many inmates said they were hungry all the time and could not land spots in academic or job-training classes. What differed were complaints about medical care and concerns about children.

Measured on a per-inmate basis, the Corrections Department spends 60% more on healthcare for women than for men. Reproductive issues are cited as one reason, but women also arrive in prison with a greater incidence of HIV and AIDS and have more mental health needs. Some inmates told the legislators that they had not had a mammogram or Pap smear in years.

“The model for women in prison in California is wrongheaded,” said state Sen. Jackie Speier (D-Hillsborough), who was joined on the sleepover by Assemblywoman Carol Liu (D-La Cañada Flintridge). “Most of the inmates we spoke to were in for DUIs and drug offenses…. Why are we spending billions upon billions to house these people in such a high-security environment?”

After years of protest from female inmates and their families, male guards may no longer conduct pat searches of women.

Dawn Davison, who runs one of the four California lockups housing women, called that a key achievement. Because more than half of female inmates have been physically or sexually abused, she said, they were traumatized anew when pat-searched by men.

As for their conduct once imprisoned, officials could find no record of a female prisoner in California killing another. By contrast, 14 male prisoners were killed by fellow convicts last year.

And although assaults and even small-scale riots are common in men’s prisons, fights among women are usually “nothing more than a lovers’ quarrel and a little slapping around,” Davison said. Attacks on staff by women, she added, rarely go beyond a kick delivered by an inmate resisting an order.

Arriving 7 1/2 months pregnant, she worried constantly about her baby’s health. She said she received iron pills and prenatal check-ups but always left the chow hall “starving.” The servings, she said, were too meager for someone eating for two.

Most upsetting, Foster recalled, was “the total lack of privacy from men,” who make up 75% of the correctional officers at Valley State.

Male guards were able to look down on women in the showers from a control room, she said, and mingled near the inmate reception area while female officers conducted strip searches, in which hand mirrors are used to search incoming inmates’ private parts for contraband. That was most humiliating, she said, for women who were menstruating.

“It’s all run by men. The doctors, the officers. There are men everywhere,” said Foster, of Redding. “You just feel violated all the time.”

Afterward, with an ankle fastened to the bed, she was allowed to spend a few days in the hospital bonding with her daughter, Olivia. Then it was back to the cellblock, where the pain of separation was enhanced by pain from breasts engorged with milk.

The prison, Foster said, crying as the memories washed over her, did not provide a pump.

California prison population:

Men: 93%
Women: 7%

Female inmates:
Number in California prisons: 10,800
Average time served: 14 months
Serving time for a nonviolent crime: more than 66%
Have been physically or sexually abused: 57%
Average age: 36 * With minor children: 64%
Babies born to inmates each year: about 300

Sources: California Department of Corrections, Little Hoover Commission

http://www.clientsystem.com/content/view/80/69/

“If you are underage, you are going to drink”

December 22, 2006

Alber’s mother, Robynne, said her son only ordered a hamburger and was humiliated in front of his parents and their friends, she wrote in a letter filed with the commission. After Alber’s mother protested, she too was asked to leave.

Dan Puerini, POP’s owner, said he won’t stop his 21-and-over policy. He said the rule is part of the restaurant’s attempt to enforce liquor laws.

“If you are underage, you are going to drink,” he said. “It’s impossible to keep track of minors in a bar where it’s like POP and its jampacked.”

http://www.boston.com/news/local/rhode_island/articles/2006/08/13/21_and_over_policy_prompts_age_discrimination_complaint/

Is he implying that all people under age 21 are going to drink alcohol?

Would Rhode Island law require restaurant employees to monitor all people inside that are under age 21 at all times, or just people when they are attempting to buy alcohol?

When Dan Puerini was 19, he borrowed some start-up cash from his mom and opened a restaurant. He had never trained to cook professionally, but he liked the kitchen and loved cooking.

http://www.tasteri.com/projo/reviews/20030327_puerinis.htm

Hmmm. 19 years old. Maybe laws were different back then.

But restaurant owner Dan Puerini says his policy is designed to prevent underaged drinking. Without the policy, he says his staff might accidentally serve alcohol to a minor on a busy night.

http://ww2.wpri.com/global/story.asp?s=5274282

Iraqi military eats rabbit

December 22, 2006

About 1,500 police officers and soldiers paraded on a soccer field, and other officers drove shiny new patrol cars and motorcycles around a dusty track ringing the field.At one point, a small group of elite Iraqi special forces officers wearing dark green T-shirts stepped forward with a live rabbit and ripped it apart with their teeth.

The leader chomped out the animal’s heart with a yell, then passed around the blood-soaked carcass to his comrades, each of whom took a bite. The group also bit the heads off frogs.

Elite Iraqi forces have demonstrated their toughness by chewing on live animals during military ceremonies since the time of Saddam Hussein’s rule.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/worldlatest/story/0,,-6293597,00.html

mad cow disease

December 17, 2006

Creekstone Farms, a Kansas beef producer, wants to reassure customers that its cattle are safe to eat by testing them all for mad cow disease. Sounds like a smart business move, but there’s one problem: The federal government won’t let the company do it.

http://www.commondreams.org/views06/0804-24.htm

1999 Seattle legal ideas

December 10, 2006

David Utevsky, a Seattle lawyer who specializes in First Amendment issues, said it is likely the courts in the long run will not look kindly on any blanket attempts to restrict political protests.

“I think the question is, what is really necessary in order to achieve the necessary goals that the city has?” Utevsky said. “It would be reasonable to keep people some distance away from the entrances of (conference) buildings, or some distance away from the president’s motorcade when he travels. But it does seem to me this zone is much bigger than is necessary, and for that reason is probably unconstitutional.

When authorities are trying to keep a distance between demonstrators and those they are demonstrating against, they can’t be kept farther apart than necessary, Utevsky argued.

“They (court decisions) say there has to be an opportunity for protesters to deliver their message to the audience they want to reach,” he said.

“This violates court rules which require access to a lawyer for arrested persons be provided as early as possible,” Boruchowitz said. “It is important that in times of stress, the most fundamental principles of our justice system not be compromised or ignored. Among the most critical of these is access to a lawyer when a person has been arrested.”

Also, police were providing food to anyone detained more than four hours, as required by law, he said.

In other developments yesterday, one aspect of the city’s state of emergency — a police order banning gas masks or their sale in the downtown core — brought an immediate promise of a lawsuit.

“I’m very angry,” said Mark Miclette, president of GasMask.com, in Dexter, Maine. “I could understand if it was a violent weapon, but this is something people need to protect from the air they breathe.

“I just think this is a basic civil right. I view it as simple as getting a weather report saying it’s going to snow, and someone saying you can’t wear a coat.”

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/civl02.shtml

banned from IHOP?

December 3, 2006

I know IHOP as a restaurant that is a little bit overpriced, and some of the food I got there recently did not taste great.

John Russo has been a victim of identity theft. So when he was asked to fork over a photo ID just to be seated at an IHOP pancake restaurant, he flipped.

http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2006/11/28/customers_unhappy_over_ihops_policy_to_ask_for_ids/

How many people have been to a restaurant with a security guard in it before?

If the restaurant has a theft problem, what would stop someone from stealing the 40 driver’s licenses?

Would someone without a driver’s license be allowed to eat there? Some people drive without a driver’s license. Some people walk to restaurants. Some people ride bicycles to restaurants or are dropped off at restaurants. Would that IHOP consider anyone not carrying a driver’s license at that time to be a potential food and service theft?

more Burger King food tampering

November 8, 2006

Two American police officers are suing Burger King after they were served hamburgers that had been sprinkled with marijuana.

Mark Landavazo and Henry Gabaldon were in uniform and driving a marked patrol car when they stopped for a meal at a drive-through Burger King restaurant in the state of New Mexico.

http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,20867,20721567-2703,00.html

Alabama lies

October 29, 2006

So this lady gets my attention and says, “Can you gimme some money? I’m starvin!” I looked at her, then looked at the van parked about 50 yards away from this woman. I pointed to the van, and told the woman that the people in the van were giving out free lunches, in case this woman was simply unaware of why all of the other people who hang out all day at Linn Park were crowded around the van. I even walked over to the van and fetched a bag of food for her.

“Naw man, I mean I need some money,” she said.

“So I guess you’re not really ‘starving’ then,” I told her. “Because people who are actually starving would gladly accept a sandwich, a bag of chips and a cold bottle of water.”

http://www.fleabomb.com/index.php?module=pagesetter&func=viewpub&tid=1&pid=288

cheeseburgers in paradise

October 23, 2006

In captured al-Qaida training handbooks, jihadists are told what to expect during interrogation. The U.S. will whip you, use dogs, give you water but not allow you to urinate, isolate you, insult your family.

“Some of them really became fond of some fast food French fries, and cheeseburgers,” Fallon said, noting that the law enforcement agents made frequent visits to a McDonald’s on the U.S. base.

Before the interrogation, they would study. Fallon sought help from a friend from the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, chief psychologist Michael Gelles, to develop training that included Arab culture and social networking, tribal origins, al-Qaida camps, the roles of shame, obedience and secrecy.

Carter recalled an Australian detainee “coming in to discuss things, and just loving a pepperoni pizza, which is pork, and him being a good Muslim. He knew it. And smoking his Marlboros.

The scripted scenarios of the intelligence interrogators, such as Rapid Fire – repeatedly asking the same question with slightly different phrasings no matter what the answer – frustrated the criminal investigators as well as the detainees.

“If we had a cooperating detainee,” Carter said, “we would share that information, but then JTF 170 would get him up in the middle of the night to have him tell them the same information. It impeded our process.”

The messages from the Bush administration and the Pentagon had been mixed: The detainees were to be treated humanely, “consistent with” the Geneva Conventions on treatment of prisoners of war. But they also said that the Geneva Conventions did not apply: These were not prisoners of war, but “enemy combatants.”

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15361458/