Archive for the ‘banking’ Category

“Northern Rock Homepage CEO Message”

September 17, 2007

Important customer notice

Dear Customer

May I begin by offering you my sincere apologies for any inconvenience you have suffered in dealing with Northern Rock during the last few days. Customer service is of paramount importance to us and due to the circumstances that surround us, you have been let down. Thank you so much for your patience, particularly when using our website which has been running very slowly due to the number of people working online.

Let me now reassure you. Your money is safe with us and if you want some, or all of it back, then you are perfectly entitled to it. Whilst you may have to wait a little longer than usual to receive it, you will get it. However, your savings are secure and there is no need for you to withdraw your money based on our recent announcement, and the widespread media coverage that has ensued. The Bank of England has agreed to provide a funding facility to enable us to manage through the current global liquidity crisis. They would not have done so, if we were not a solvent, adequately capitalised, well run bank. I hope this helps to reassure you.

Your custom is very important to us and I sincerely hope you choose to stay with us along with the vast majority of our customer base.

Yours sincerely

Adam J Applegarth
Chief Executive

16 September 2007

© northern rock 2007

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another man arrested at a California bank

January 3, 2007

Once again, David Lazarus from the San Francisco Chronicle and radio talk show host Clark Howard are reporting about a bank customer arrested and jailed for trying to cash or deposit [a] check/s.

I heard that Steven Chesser originally took the checks to a Washington Mutual bank branch and the teller did not like the looks of the checks or something, so Steven went across the street to a Wells Fargo bank branch and the checks were accepted there.

Unlike the earlier Bank of America story, Wells Fargo probably will not lose any customers because of this incident.
However, some local criminal justice establishments in California may be slowly losing their credibility because of their seeming lack of organization skills and their arbitrary actions.

I do not think that the stated charges of “check forgery” “commercial burglary” are actually applicable here. I do not think that receiving a check in the mail and then presenting the check to a bank teller should be considered an illegal act. However, the people making the fake checks should be sought out and prosecuted.

Jay Boyarsky, the supervising deputy district attorney, acknowledged that “the criminal justice system does not always deal well with people who have mental disabilities.”

For the time being, however, Chesser remains behind bars. He’s being held in a special wing “for inmates who need mental health treatment,” according to jail spokesman Mark Cursi.

Chesser doesn’t read very well and doesn’t always comprehend what’s going on around him, his father said. He’s worked as a janitor and held other unskilled jobs. He’s easily taken advantage of by others.

“When he’s working, his friends always come around on payday and get him to buy them beer,” William Chesser said. “That sort of thing is common.”

William Chesser said his son went to a Wells Fargo branch in Cupertino with a couple of checks he’d received, ostensibly worth a total of about $2,000. Chesser opened a checking account, deposited the funds and asked for some money.

So Chesser went to the bank yet again with even more checks. And this time, bank officials suspected something was up. They called the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Department and Chesser was promptly arrested for passing bad checks.

“He was attempting to deposit numerous checks,” said Deputy Serg Palanov, a spokesman for the Sheriff’s Department.

Chris Hammond, a Wells Fargo spokesman, said, “There is more to the story, but we are not able to disclose it because we must respect the privacy of the customer’s information.”

He added: “Wells Fargo does not make decisions based on a customer or potential customer’s appearance. However, if a team member observes questionable or suspicious actions or behaviors in our banking store, it may be appropriate to contact authorities to ensure the safety of our customers and team members.”

“I asked him if he knew why he was there,” the father continued. “He said it was for opening an account at Wells Fargo.

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/12/20/BUGK2N2M051.DTL

some bank employees

December 6, 2006

“Just because they’re handling your money doesn’t mean they are rocket scientists. Banks put a lot of pressure on their staff in a sweatshop kind of atmosphere,” says Ed Mierzwinski, consumer program director for the U.S. Public Interest Research Group, a consumer advocacy group.

http://www.bankrate.com/brm/news/sav/Nov06_bank_errora3.asp

Why did Bank of America and Oprah team up?

October 31, 2006

On a show that aired Monday, Winfrey gave more than 300 audience members $1,000 debit cards sponsored by the Bank of America to donate to a charitable cause.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/30/AR2006103000494.html

See my earlier post here:
https://bork.wordpress.com/2006/10/16/guy-arrested-at-a-bank-of-america-in-san-francisco/

It may be possible that Bank of America is trying to offset the Clark Howard led boycott.

Whatever happened to humble and anonymous charitable contributions?

guy arrested at a Bank of America in San Francisco

October 16, 2006

“A few minutes later, four SFPD officers came into the bank. They didn’t say a thing. They just kicked my legs apart and handcuffed me behind my back.”

The police report for Shinnick’s arrest says he was taken into custody “for the safety of the bank employees as well as the bank customers.”

Shinnick said he was never read his rights. He said he was instructed by one of the cops to keep his mouth shut and not say anything. Shinnick said he remained handcuffed in the bank lobby for about 45 minutes while the police spoke with BofA workers.

The Supreme Court case, Hagberg vs. California Federal Bank, was remarkably similar to Shinnick’s. It involved a woman who presented an unusually large check for deposit from her stockbroker.

A teller believed the check was phony and called the police. The check turned out to be real, but by then the police had arrived and had handcuffed the woman.

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/08/30/BUGTGKRHSF1.DTL

bank-of-america-letter.jpg

A few people may now refuse to accept Bank of America checks from strangers.

The staring by the branch manager may have been some type of visual criminal profiling.

While researching this issue, I found out that the San Francisco Police Department is supposedly “In Crisis” for other reasons:

http://www.sfgate.com/sfpd/

Meanwhile, radio talk show host Clark Howard is charting some kind of Bank of America boycott:

http://clarkhoward.com/topics/boa_meter.html